Subscribe to the magazine
 
 
A young man becomes paralyzed in a shooting near his church, and struggles with identifying the shooter, whom he recognizes as a former classmate (link includes parts one and two):

Surgeons had labored for five hours to patch his left lung, remove his left kidney and his spleen. They could do nothing to repair his L1 vertebra. His legs were paralyzed.
A nurse brought pad and pen. Davien wanted to tell his family about the shooting. He had recognized the shooter, but he was too scared to write down a name.
Instead, he scribbled: ‘I forgive them.’
Days later, Sheriff’s Det. Scott Schulze showed up at Davien’s bedside with a series of mug shots.
Davien spotted the shooter immediately. Jimmy Santana had taken gym classes with him in middle school and later joined a Latino gang, Monrovia Nuevo Varrio, or MNV.
The detective asked Davien if the shooter was among the photos.
Davien feared what could happen if he snitched. He also believed as a Christian that it was wrong to lie.

"Standing Up: Davien’s Story." — Molly Hennessy-Fiske, The Los Angeles Times
More from the L.A. Times

A young man becomes paralyzed in a shooting near his church, and struggles with identifying the shooter, whom he recognizes as a former classmate (link includes parts one and two):

Surgeons had labored for five hours to patch his left lung, remove his left kidney and his spleen. They could do nothing to repair his L1 vertebra. His legs were paralyzed.

A nurse brought pad and pen. Davien wanted to tell his family about the shooting. He had recognized the shooter, but he was too scared to write down a name.

Instead, he scribbled: ‘I forgive them.’

Days later, Sheriff’s Det. Scott Schulze showed up at Davien’s bedside with a series of mug shots.

Davien spotted the shooter immediately. Jimmy Santana had taken gym classes with him in middle school and later joined a Latino gang, Monrovia Nuevo Varrio, or MNV.

The detective asked Davien if the shooter was among the photos.

Davien feared what could happen if he snitched. He also believed as a Christian that it was wrong to lie.

"Standing Up: Davien’s Story." — Molly Hennessy-Fiske, The Los Angeles Times

More from the L.A. Times

American Airlines once sold a lifetime pass for unlimited first-class travel. They soon regretted it:

In September 2007, a pricing analyst reviewing international routes focused the airline’s attention on how much the AAirpass program was costing, company emails show.
'We pay the taxes,' a revenue management executive wrote in a subsequent email. 'We award AAdvantage miles, and we lose the seat every time they fly.'
Cade was assigned to find out whether any AAirpass holders were violating the rules, starting with those who flew the most.
She pulled years of flight records for Rothstein and Vroom and calculated that each was costing American more than $1 million a year.

"The Frequent Fliers Who Flew Too Much." — Ken Bensinger, Los Angeles Times
More #longreads from the Los Angeles Times

American Airlines once sold a lifetime pass for unlimited first-class travel. They soon regretted it:

In September 2007, a pricing analyst reviewing international routes focused the airline’s attention on how much the AAirpass program was costing, company emails show.

'We pay the taxes,' a revenue management executive wrote in a subsequent email. 'We award AAdvantage miles, and we lose the seat every time they fly.'

Cade was assigned to find out whether any AAirpass holders were violating the rules, starting with those who flew the most.

She pulled years of flight records for Rothstein and Vroom and calculated that each was costing American more than $1 million a year.

"The Frequent Fliers Who Flew Too Much." — Ken Bensinger, Los Angeles Times

More #longreads from the Los Angeles Times

Pete O’Neal, 70, founded the Kansas City chapter of the Black Panther party and once threatened to “shoot my way into the House of Representatives.” He fled the country in 1970, eventually landing in Tanzania:

Exile was supposed to be temporary. O’Neal corresponded with other Panthers and planned to return home to help lead the revolution. He watched from abroad as the party collapsed from infighting, arrests and an FBI campaign of surveillance and sabotage. People stopped talking about revolution. Radicals found new lives.
"O’Neal’s exile became permanent. His fury abated. Some of it was age. Some of it was Tanzania, where strangers always materialized to push your Land Rover out of the mud, and where conflicts were resolved in community meetings in which everyone got to speak, interminably.


"Former Black Panther Patches Together Purpose in Africa Exile." — Christopher Goffard, Los Angeles Times
See also: "Elmer ‘Geronimo’ Pratt: The Untold Story of the Black Panther Leader, Dead At 63." — Kate Coleman, June 27, 2011

Pete O’Neal, 70, founded the Kansas City chapter of the Black Panther party and once threatened to “shoot my way into the House of Representatives.” He fled the country in 1970, eventually landing in Tanzania:

Exile was supposed to be temporary. O’Neal corresponded with other Panthers and planned to return home to help lead the revolution. He watched from abroad as the party collapsed from infighting, arrests and an FBI campaign of surveillance and sabotage. People stopped talking about revolution. Radicals found new lives.

"O’Neal’s exile became permanent. His fury abated. Some of it was age. Some of it was Tanzania, where strangers always materialized to push your Land Rover out of the mud, and where conflicts were resolved in community meetings in which everyone got to speak, interminably.

"Former Black Panther Patches Together Purpose in Africa Exile." — Christopher Goffard, Los Angeles Times

See also: "Elmer ‘Geronimo’ Pratt: The Untold Story of the Black Panther Leader, Dead At 63." — Kate Coleman, June 27, 2011

A man, brought to the U.S. as a toddler, is suddenly deported to Mexico. He’s now trying to get back:

The train had covered 10 miles through the high desert when it stopped at a U.S. Customs and Border Protection checkpoint. An inspector and his canine walked by on the gravel path. Luna stifled his breath and prayed. Then he felt a sharp tug and a dog’s hot breath.
A German shepherd sank its teeth through Luna’s two shirts, locked onto his ribs and dragged him out from under the train. He clutched his side.

"Without a Country: Immigrant Tries to Get Back to the Life He Knew." — Richard Marosi, Los Angeles Times
See also: "My Life as an Undocumented Immigrant." — Jose Antonio Vargas, New York Times, June 22, 2011

A man, brought to the U.S. as a toddler, is suddenly deported to Mexico. He’s now trying to get back:

The train had covered 10 miles through the high desert when it stopped at a U.S. Customs and Border Protection checkpoint. An inspector and his canine walked by on the gravel path. Luna stifled his breath and prayed. Then he felt a sharp tug and a dog’s hot breath.

A German shepherd sank its teeth through Luna’s two shirts, locked onto his ribs and dragged him out from under the train. He clutched his side.

"Without a Country: Immigrant Tries to Get Back to the Life He Knew." — Richard Marosi, Los Angeles Times

See also: "My Life as an Undocumented Immigrant." — Jose Antonio Vargas, New York Times, June 22, 2011

Cain, writer of “The Postman Always Rings Twice,” “Double Indemnity” and “Mildred Pierce,” on the pros and cons of living in Southern California in the 1930s:

There is no reward for aesthetic virtue here, no punishment for aesthetic crime; nothing but a vast cosmic indifference, and that is the one thing the human imagination cannot stand. It withers, or else, frantic to make itself felt, goes off into feverish and idiotic excursions that have neither reason, rhyme, nor point, and that even fail in their one, purpose, which is to attract notice.
Now, in spite of the foregoing, when you come to consider the life that is encountered here, you have to admit that there is a great deal to be said for it.

"Paradise." — James M. Cain, Los Angeles Times, March 1, 1933
See also: "Sweatpants in Paradise." — Molly Young, The Believer, Sept. 1, 2010

Cain, writer of “The Postman Always Rings Twice,” “Double Indemnity” and “Mildred Pierce,” on the pros and cons of living in Southern California in the 1930s:

There is no reward for aesthetic virtue here, no punishment for aesthetic crime; nothing but a vast cosmic indifference, and that is the one thing the human imagination cannot stand. It withers, or else, frantic to make itself felt, goes off into feverish and idiotic excursions that have neither reason, rhyme, nor point, and that even fail in their one, purpose, which is to attract notice.

Now, in spite of the foregoing, when you come to consider the life that is encountered here, you have to admit that there is a great deal to be said for it.

"Paradise." — James M. Cain, Los Angeles Times, March 1, 1933

See also: "Sweatpants in Paradise." — Molly Young, The Believer, Sept. 1, 2010


And so began the improbable last chapter in the fall of a major newspaper, as chronicled by O’Shea in The Deal from Hell: How Moguls and Wall Street Plundered Great American Newspapers. Among other things, the book is a reminder that whenever you think things can’t get worse, they can. They can get much, much worse.
I was there, at the paper, working at the magazine, with a good critic’s seat, up close and on the aisle. As we were living it, we knew this tawdry drama signaled yet another sea change for newspapers, with potentially devastating consequences for our democracy. It was also, thanks to Zell and his cronies, more entertaining than it had any right to be.

"Zell to L.A. Times: Drop Dead." — Laurie Winer, Los Angeles Review of Books
See more #longreads from the Los Angeles Review of Books

And so began the improbable last chapter in the fall of a major newspaper, as chronicled by O’Shea in The Deal from Hell: How Moguls and Wall Street Plundered Great American Newspapers. Among other things, the book is a reminder that whenever you think things can’t get worse, they can. They can get much, much worse.

I was there, at the paper, working at the magazine, with a good critic’s seat, up close and on the aisle. As we were living it, we knew this tawdry drama signaled yet another sea change for newspapers, with potentially devastating consequences for our democracy. It was also, thanks to Zell and his cronies, more entertaining than it had any right to be.

"Zell to L.A. Times: Drop Dead." — Laurie Winer, Los Angeles Review of Books

See more #longreads from the Los Angeles Review of Books


Dutcher had been duped.
The women who’d ogled him worked for Butler’s detective agency. Sharon, who told Dutcher she was a divorcee employed by an investment firm, actually was a former Las Vegas showgirl.
A man who once worked for Butler had blown the whistle. He told authorities Butler arranged for men to be arrested for drunk driving at the behest of their ex-wives and their divorce lawyers — and that entrapment was only one of many alleged misdeeds.


"Coming clean on ‘dirty DUIs’ in Contra Costa County." — Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
See more #longreads from The Los Angeles Times

Dutcher had been duped.

The women who’d ogled him worked for Butler’s detective agency. Sharon, who told Dutcher she was a divorcee employed by an investment firm, actually was a former Las Vegas showgirl.

A man who once worked for Butler had blown the whistle. He told authorities Butler arranged for men to be arrested for drunk driving at the behest of their ex-wives and their divorce lawyers — and that entrapment was only one of many alleged misdeeds.

"Coming clean on ‘dirty DUIs’ in Contra Costa County." — Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times

See more #longreads from The Los Angeles Times


Maria had nothing of her own besides socks and a blouse, potentially giving a pimp an opening to woo her with niceties. So Quintero pawed through V-necks, corduroys and bags of underwear at an on-site donation center. She packed a bag: hair spray, razors, lavender shampoo-conditioner, “Chicken Soup for the Teenage Soul,” and a flowered journal because Maria liked to write poems. Quintero tried to shake off her misgivings: With a bag of stuff, was it easier for Maria to run? A week later, in Voy’s courtroom, the judge was grim. The night after Maria’s hearing, she ran off. Quintero never found out if she took the bag.

"Hostages of child prostitution." Ashley Powers, Los Angeles Times
See more #longreads from the Los Angeles Times
(Photo Credit: Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)

Maria had nothing of her own besides socks and a blouse, potentially giving a pimp an opening to woo her with niceties. So Quintero pawed through V-necks, corduroys and bags of underwear at an on-site donation center. She packed a bag: hair spray, razors, lavender shampoo-conditioner, “Chicken Soup for the Teenage Soul,” and a flowered journal because Maria liked to write poems. Quintero tried to shake off her misgivings: With a bag of stuff, was it easier for Maria to run? A week later, in Voy’s courtroom, the judge was grim. The night after Maria’s hearing, she ran off. Quintero never found out if she took the bag.

"Hostages of child prostitution." Ashley Powers, Los Angeles Times

See more #longreads from the Los Angeles Times

(Photo Credit: Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)