Subscribe to the magazine
 
 
Photojournalist Tyler Hicks on his last trip into Syria with New York Times reporter Anthony Shadid, who later died:

The ammunition seemed evidence of the risk we were taking — a risk we did not shoulder lightly. Anthony, who passionately documented the eruptions in the Arab world from Iraq to Libya for The New York Times, felt it was essential that journalists get into Syria, where about 7,000 people have been killed, largely out of the world’s view. We had spent months planning to stay safe.
It turned out the real danger was not the weapons but possibly the horses. Anthony was allergic. He did not know how badly.

"Bearing Witness in Syria: A Correspondent’s Last Days." — Tyler Hicks, The New York Times
See also: ”4 Times Journalists Held Captive in Libya Faced Days of Brutality.” — Anthony Shadid, Lynsey Addario, Stephen Farrell and Tyler Hicks, The New York Times, March 22, 2011

Photojournalist Tyler Hicks on his last trip into Syria with New York Times reporter Anthony Shadid, who later died:

The ammunition seemed evidence of the risk we were taking — a risk we did not shoulder lightly. Anthony, who passionately documented the eruptions in the Arab world from Iraq to Libya for The New York Times, felt it was essential that journalists get into Syria, where about 7,000 people have been killed, largely out of the world’s view. We had spent months planning to stay safe.

It turned out the real danger was not the weapons but possibly the horses. Anthony was allergic. He did not know how badly.

"Bearing Witness in Syria: A Correspondent’s Last Days." — Tyler Hicks, The New York Times

See also: ”4 Times Journalists Held Captive in Libya Faced Days of Brutality.” — Anthony Shadid, Lynsey Addario, Stephen Farrell and Tyler Hicks, The New York Times, March 22, 2011


Even that Tuesday, a pattern had begun to emerge. The beating was always fiercest in the first few minutes, an aggressiveness that Colonel Qaddafi’s bizarre and twisted four decades of rule inculcated in a society that feels disfigured. It didn’t matter that we were bound, or that Lynsey was a woman. But moments of kindness inevitably emerged, drawing on a culture’s far deeper instinct for hospitality and generosity. A soldier brought Tyler and Anthony, sitting in a pickup, dates and an orange drink. Lynsey had to talk to a soldier’s wife who, in English, called her a donkey and a dog. Then they unbound Lynsey and, sitting in another truck, gave Steve and her something to drink.

"4 Times Journalists Held Captive in Libya Faced Days of Brutality." — Anthony Shadid, Lynsey Addario, Stephen Farrell and Tyler Hicks, The New York Times, March 22, 2011
Photo: ANTHONY SHADID. The reporter, middle right, interviewed  residents of Imbaba, a lower-class neighborhood of Cairo, on Feb. 2,  during the days of street demonstrations leading to the resignation of  President Hosni Mubarak. (Credit: Ed Ou for The New York Times)

Even that Tuesday, a pattern had begun to emerge. The beating was always fiercest in the first few minutes, an aggressiveness that Colonel Qaddafi’s bizarre and twisted four decades of rule inculcated in a society that feels disfigured. It didn’t matter that we were bound, or that Lynsey was a woman. But moments of kindness inevitably emerged, drawing on a culture’s far deeper instinct for hospitality and generosity. A soldier brought Tyler and Anthony, sitting in a pickup, dates and an orange drink. Lynsey had to talk to a soldier’s wife who, in English, called her a donkey and a dog. Then they unbound Lynsey and, sitting in another truck, gave Steve and her something to drink.

"4 Times Journalists Held Captive in Libya Faced Days of Brutality." — Anthony Shadid, Lynsey Addario, Stephen Farrell and Tyler Hicks, The New York Times, March 22, 2011

Photo: ANTHONY SHADID. The reporter, middle right, interviewed residents of Imbaba, a lower-class neighborhood of Cairo, on Feb. 2, during the days of street demonstrations leading to the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Credit: Ed Ou for The New York Times)

The power of habits in guiding our behavior—and how companies like Target have used customer data to create new buying habits:

There are, however, some brief periods in a person’s life when old routines fall apart and buying habits are suddenly in flux. One of those moments — the moment, really — is right around the birth of a child, when parents are exhausted and overwhelmed and their shopping patterns and brand loyalties are up for grabs. But as Target’s marketers explained to Pole, timing is everything. Because birth records are usually public, the moment a couple have a new baby, they are almost instantaneously barraged with offers and incentives and advertisements from all sorts of companies. Which means that the key is to reach them earlier, before any other retailers know a baby is on the way. Specifically, the marketers said they wanted to send specially designed ads to women in their second trimester, which is when most expectant mothers begin buying all sorts of new things, like prenatal vitamins and maternity clothing. ‘Can you give us a list?’ the marketers asked.

"How Companies Learn Your Secrets." — Charles Duhigg, New York Times
See more #longreads from Charles Duhigg

The power of habits in guiding our behavior—and how companies like Target have used customer data to create new buying habits:

There are, however, some brief periods in a person’s life when old routines fall apart and buying habits are suddenly in flux. One of those moments — the moment, really — is right around the birth of a child, when parents are exhausted and overwhelmed and their shopping patterns and brand loyalties are up for grabs. But as Target’s marketers explained to Pole, timing is everything. Because birth records are usually public, the moment a couple have a new baby, they are almost instantaneously barraged with offers and incentives and advertisements from all sorts of companies. Which means that the key is to reach them earlier, before any other retailers know a baby is on the way. Specifically, the marketers said they wanted to send specially designed ads to women in their second trimester, which is when most expectant mothers begin buying all sorts of new things, like prenatal vitamins and maternity clothing. ‘Can you give us a list?’ the marketers asked.

"How Companies Learn Your Secrets." — Charles Duhigg, New York Times

See more #longreads from Charles Duhigg

The harsh working conditions inside factories that make products for Apple:

"We’ve known about labor abuses in some factories for four years, and they’re still going on," said one former Apple executive who, like others, spoke on the condition of anonymity because of confidentiality agreements. "Why? Because the system works for us. Suppliers would change everything tomorrow if Apple told them they didn’t have another choice."
“If half of iPhones were malfunctioning, do you think Apple would let it go on for four years?” the executive asked.

"Human Costs Are Built Into an iPad." — Charles Duhigg, David Barboza, The New York Times
Previously: "Apple, America and a Squeezed Middle Class." — Charles Duhigg, Keith Bradsher, The New York Times
See also this #Audiofiles story: "Mr. Daisey and the Apple Factory." This American Life, Jan. 6, 2012

The harsh working conditions inside factories that make products for Apple:

"We’ve known about labor abuses in some factories for four years, and they’re still going on," said one former Apple executive who, like others, spoke on the condition of anonymity because of confidentiality agreements. "Why? Because the system works for us. Suppliers would change everything tomorrow if Apple told them they didn’t have another choice."

“If half of iPhones were malfunctioning, do you think Apple would let it go on for four years?” the executive asked.

"Human Costs Are Built Into an iPad." — Charles Duhigg, David Barboza, The New York Times

Previously: "Apple, America and a Squeezed Middle Class." — Charles Duhigg, Keith Bradsher, The New York Times

See also this #Audiofiles story: "Mr. Daisey and the Apple Factory." This American Life, Jan. 6, 2012


From the beginning, their physical relationship was governed by the peculiar ways their respective brains processed sensory messages. Like many people with autism, each had uncomfortable sensitivities to types of touch or texture, and they came in different combinations.
Jack recoiled when Kirsten tried to give him a back massage, pushing deeply with her palms.
“Pet me,” he said, showing her, his fingers grazing her skin. But Kirsten, who had always hated the feeling of light touch, shrank from his caress.
“Only deep pressure,” she showed him, hugging herself.
He tried to kiss her, but it was hard for her to enjoy it, so obvious was his aversion. To him, kissing felt like what it was, he told her: mashing your face against someone else’s. Neither did he like the sweaty feeling of hand-holding, a sensation that seemed to dominate all others whenever they tried it.


"Navigating Love and Autism." — Amy Harmon, The New York Times
See more #longreads about autism

From the beginning, their physical relationship was governed by the peculiar ways their respective brains processed sensory messages. Like many people with autism, each had uncomfortable sensitivities to types of touch or texture, and they came in different combinations.

Jack recoiled when Kirsten tried to give him a back massage, pushing deeply with her palms.

“Pet me,” he said, showing her, his fingers grazing her skin. But Kirsten, who had always hated the feeling of light touch, shrank from his caress.

“Only deep pressure,” she showed him, hugging herself.

He tried to kiss her, but it was hard for her to enjoy it, so obvious was his aversion. To him, kissing felt like what it was, he told her: mashing your face against someone else’s. Neither did he like the sweaty feeling of hand-holding, a sensation that seemed to dominate all others whenever they tried it.

"Navigating Love and Autism." — Amy Harmon, The New York Times

See more #longreads about autism